Monday, March 23, 2015

Te Kahui Manu Hokai: PLACE 2015, 5th national Maori GIS conference..

A panui from Te Kahui Manu Hokai who are pleased to announce PLACE 2015, their fifth national Maori GIS conference

Where: The Copthorne, Bay of Islands, Waitangi
When: June 10th – 12th, 2015

This conference will complete a northward journey commenced in Christchurch (2009), Wellington (2010), Rotorua (2012) and then Auckland in 2013. We anticipate it will be as exciting and interesting for Māori practitioners and/or those Roopu interested in its application as it was at Sky City in 2013.

A call for presentations will be made soon. Te Kahui Manu Hokai remain committed to being 'software neutral' so feel free to design a korero about what you feel passionate about, whether it is QGIS or ESRI or Google (and there’s plenty of others too). If you feel like sharing what your roopu has been up to in the Maori Geospatial Space; then this is a perfect venue and forum for you.

The komiti is busy working on details for online registrations and we want to get all that information out as soon as they can. I will pass on all their panui :)

Sunday, March 08, 2015

Maori University Entrance dropped off a cliff...

UE pass rates for Maori have dropped from 53% to 36%.

For those who thought having a Maori Minister of Education would help, well, now we know...

Pasifika pass rates are also down, from a shit 47% to a really shit 34%.

NCEA standards were raised last year after concerns on the number of first year uni students dropping out (22% of Maori, 11% of Pakeha). Retention and completion are key indicators of institutional success (and therefore funding).

And while public comments on our Universities are always full of disdain for a tertiary education, I always argue that graduate numbers and diversity are fundamental to economic productivity. A degree also opens the world for our young people, socially, culturally, and - I'd never knock this last reason - economically.

Without tertiary-educated Maori, the so-called Maori economy will continue to be a price-taking commodity export business and the wider NZ economy will continue to flatline.

So, what now?

I'd dump Hekia Parata, pump money into high-school tutoring for our students, and pump more money into university tutoring.

I'd ban salad forks too, but that's just a personal thang...

Friday, February 27, 2015

Post-disaster Iwi demographic changes

The following maps were generated from census data responses to the 'Iwi' census question (in which an individual can name up to five iwi).

Maps show the change in South Island populations of selected Iwi between 2006 and 2013, in Territorial Authority districts.

Note: the scale of the dots representing population sizes vary between maps, so not all maps are visually comparable. Many thanks to Cathy Mountier for the GIS work in producing these.

Ngai Tahu

Ngati Porou

Tainui

Te Arawa

Te Ati Awa (Te Wai Pounamu)

Te Ati Awa (Taranaki)

Tuhoe

Monday, February 09, 2015

The Ohlone/Costanoan People, Indian Canyon



I'm heading to San Jose. First Nations there are the Ohlone/Costanoan people. (Many thanks to Melissa Nelson of SFU for this information :) The video above and image below are sourced through their websites and resources.

I'm speaking at the inaugural Citizen Science Conference on Indigenous Peoples and Citizen Science. My theme is to unpack the implications of 'citizenship' on CitSci with the intent to illuminate the struggle of Indigenous Peoples worldwide to be accepted as First Citizens on their own lands. Good science can only come out of good (by which I mean inclusive, ethical) politics...




Maori Economy news dump

Info coming thick and fast, no puns intended...
Maori economy
Weekly update 8 February 2015
NEWS
Prospects appear even brighter for Maori economic renaissance
Selwyn Hayes, EY Tahi, has big expectations for the Maori economy, now estimated to be worth about $40 billion. Photo / Christine Cornege.
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant
3News NZ
Study affirms potential for Māori economic growth
Māori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell today welcomed the release of a study confirming Northland has significant economic potential and ...
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant
Northland study affirms potential for Maori economic growth
MÄ ori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell today welcomed the release of a study confirming Northland has significant economic potential and ...
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant
waateanews.com
Maori money vital for Northland economy
Mr Joyce says improving economic outcomes in the region is key to ... yesterday released their own strategy on how to grow the Maori economy.
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant
Taitokerau economic growth strategy welcomed
Mr Flavell says the study aligns well with the Māori Economic Development Strategy: He Kai Kei Aku Ringa, which sets out a blueprint for growing the ...
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant
Economic potential mostly untapped
The brainchild of the Taitokerau Iwi Chief Executives Consortium, the strategy sets out a pathway for developing the Maori economy without ...
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant
Radio New Zealand
Land law change essential, says PM
"If we can make this land work for Maori, then it will add up to $8billion to the economy and create at least 4000 new jobs over the next decade.".
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant
Little's argument 175 years too late
On Friday it was reported the Maori economy from treaty settlements is now worth 40 billion dollars and in just a few brief years it will be worth 100 ...
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant
Herald Sun
Rt Hon John Key - Waitangi Day Breakfast Speech
If we can make this land work for Maori, then it will add up to $8 billion to the economy and create at least 4000 new jobs over the next decade.
Google Plus Facebook Twitter Flag as irrelevant

Simon Lambert

Create Your Badge